Existing Problems and Countermeasures in International Service Trade

Existing Problems and Countermeasures in International Service Trade

International trade in services is unevenly developed internationally. The industrialized countries have an absolute advantage in international trade in services. According to statistics, industrialized countries accounted for 78.6% of the world’s service trade in 1986, of which more than 75% of all projects accounted for transportation, investment net income and tourism revenue. Among the top 20 service exporting countries in the world, the developed countries account for the vast majority. The industrialized countries are surplus countries in service trade. Taking factor services into account, the United States is a major exporter. However, France, the United Kingdom and Italy were the most successful countries in terms of export of services in a narrow sense, while the United States took the second place. Japan and Germany are the obvious exceptions. The two countries have drastically exceeded trade in goods but have a structural deficit in the service sector. In the service industry, the two countries are highly competitive in terms of cargo transportation. However, competition among industrialized countries in the international service market is also intense. There are various contradictions among EU countries and the United States in their fight to gain market share in developing countries. Their policies on international trade in services are also greatly different.

On July 26, 1995, the GATS multilateral agreement on financial services trade adopted in Brussels rejected the U.S. sign that some of its provisions failed to take care of their market competition interests. The changes in the share of industrialized countries in the international service markets reflect their uneven development in the field of international trade in services. For developing countries, except for individual projects such as tourism and labor repatriation (ie, based on the export of labor), they are all deficit in trade in services. For the vast majority of developing countries, services do not make a positive contribution to their external sector. Projects that experience surpluses on labor exports are often unable to retain most of their added value due to lack of capital and information, or due to the control of large service multinationals (in the hospitality, aerospace and other fields). On the other hand, to find export opportunities in an increasingly competitive market, developing countries have to import services from industrialized countries in order to gain access to the country’s commodity markets for sales. The balance of payments deficit in many of these countries, especially in the area of ??producer services, shows a continuing and rising trend. Despite all kinds of imbalances, due to the conclusion of the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Trade in Services and the establishment of the World Trade Organization, member countries of different levels of development will voluntarily or involuntarily participate in international trade in services Go in the market competition. Before the 1970s, the world trade in services was concentrated in western industrialized countries. In the 1970s, several major oil-producing countries in the Middle East absorbed a large amount of investment due to their abundant oil revenues and became the major market for international services in the world. Since the 1980s, with the rapid economic development of the Asia-Pacific region, especially the rise of the “four little dragons,” the international service market in Southeast Asia has been very active. International service markets in all regions of the world have been rapidly developing, and the multi-dimensional competition in international trade in services will become even more pronounced.

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