India’s epidemic intensifies shortage of anti-epidemic medical supplies

India's epidemic intensifies shortage of anti-epidemic medical supplies

On April 25, when the Indian Central Government convened the chief ministers of the severely affected states to discuss countermeasures, the person in charge, Vinod Paul, pointed out that Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, and New Delhi will become the newest cases by the end of this month. In fast-track areas, it is estimated that when the current round of the epidemic reaches its peak in mid-May, India will have up to 500,000 new confirmed cases every day.

Hospitals are overcrowded, oxygen cylinders and other medical equipment are in short supply, hospital casualties are frequent… and even the remains are “queuing for cremation”. This is the current status of the epidemic in India.

According to the Indian government’s estimation, New Delhi will “gap” 16,061 beds equipped with oxygen equipment, approximately 2,877 intensive care beds, and 1,450 ventilators every day; Uttar Pradesh will “gap” approximately 16,752 beds equipped with oxygen equipment every day. 3061 intensive care beds and 1538 ventilators.

The hospital bed is also “difficult to find.” India’s Minister of Transport, Vijay Singh Kumar, once pleaded on social media: “Please help us, my brother needs a bed to treat the new crown.”

Due to a large number of infected people, India now has insufficient medical resources. In addition to insufficient supply of oxygen and hospital beds, the Indian government also stated that there is a shortage of vaccine supply.

Only a few months ago, India was full of confidence in the production of the new crown vaccine. However, in the face of a new round of the epidemic, India still has a “vaccine shortage”. According to reports, India has canceled vaccine exports since March. Since mid-April, a large number of vaccination centers have been closed due to a shortage of vaccines. Among them, about 700 in Odisha Bang in the east have been closed within a week.

At the same time, the virus strains circulating in India also showed double mutations.

It is understood that the double mutant strain of India B.1.617 has been detected in India since October 2020. It is called the “double mutant” virus strain because it contains the E484Q and L452R mutations on the S protein. It is the first to be found to carry both Two mutant strains. As of April 20, the double mutant strain of B.1.617 has been detected in more than 20 countries, but no major outbreaks similar to India have occurred in other countries. According to the epidemic trend suggested by genome data, the transmissibility of B.1.617 (Indian mutant) is comparable to that of B.1.17 (British mutant), and higher than that of B.1.351 (South African strain).

However, Zhang Wenhong pointed out that the mutation of the virus is not the reason for the complete out-of-control of the epidemic. The main reason for the rapid increase in mortality in India is medical runs. “When the oxygen supply can’t keep up, many young patients may die. You can survive a breath of oxygen. What India needs most is oxygen. Oxygen is better than any medicine and can effectively reduce the mortality of young patients.”

Maria van Kokhoff, technical director of the WHO Health Emergency Project, believes that the surge in cases in India is the result of a combination of factors, including the premature cancellation of public health control measures, some people have not followed instructions, and have not been able to cover the vaccine. The most in need such as medical workers and the elderly, as well as the mutation of the virus. “When these factors occur at the same time, an outbreak similar to India is absolutely possible, and it may occur in other countries.”

The above-mentioned corporate executives told the 21st Century Business Herald reporter that the current control of the epidemic in India is indeed not optimistic, and medical resources are comprehensively lacking. Business people are working from home and online, and many of them are actively self-isolating.