The US government plans to impose tariffs on tea imported from China

The US government plans to impose tariffs on tea imported from China

For Peter Geji, who has been committed to promoting tea drinking in the United States for many years, the US government intends to impose tariffs on tea imported from China, which is extremely worrying.
The United States is not a tea-producing country, but it is an emerging tea consumer market; the imposition of tariffs on Chinese tea does not protect the domestic producers but may damage a tea market that is hard to cultivate.
Goji, who has been working hard to cultivate Americans’ tea drinking habits for the past several decades, is currently the president of the American Tea Association and has served in the world-renowned tea company Lipton.
On June 21, as a representative of the industry, Goji, when the US government plans to impose a tariff on the US$300 million worth of Chinese exports to the United States, publicly opposes the US government’s taxation on tea and hopes to import black tea from China. Products such as green tea are removed from the tax collection list.
Geji told Xinhua News Agency that although Americans still prefer coffee more than tea, after years of cultivation, the size of the US tea market has grown from about $2.5 billion 20 years ago to 12.5 billion today. Dollar.
According to statistics from the American Tea Association, about 80% of Americans drink tea, and in the younger millennials, the proportion of tea is 87%. More than eight of the teas Americans drink become black tea, and green tea accounts for about 15%.
In recent years, Americans’ interest in Chinese tea is gradually rising, especially regional tea products with the unique taste, appearance, and aroma, which are favored by more and more Americans.
West Lake Longjing and Yunnan Black Tea are personal favorites of Goji. “The production process of Longjing Tea is very fine, the leaves are very beautiful, I like the way the tea is sitting in the cup, and the wonderful aroma and taste.”
Geji said that due to the particularity of terrain, climate and local manufacturing processes, Chinese tea-based Longjing, Pu’er, Tieguanyin and other teas could not find alternative suppliers elsewhere. If tariffs are imposed on these products, American consumers, as well as tea importers, will suffer.
Chinese tea has covered all areas of the US tea market. Goji said that whether it is the ordinary tea provided in the restaurant or the relatively high-end famous tea such as Longjing; whether it is sold in the supermarket or ordered online, Chinese tea is ubiquitous in the US tea market.
Goji said that tariffs will bring risk to the US consumers, but at the same time, they will not have much impact on Chinese tea producers, because the tea exported to the United States accounts for less than 1% of China’s total tea production.

For Peter Geji, who has been committed to promoting tea drinking in the United States for many years, the US government intends to impose tariffs on tea imported from China, which is extremely worrying.

The United States is not a tea-producing country, but it is an emerging tea consumer market; the imposition of tariffs on Chinese tea does not protect the domestic producers but may damage a tea market that is hard to cultivate.

Goji, who has been working hard to cultivate Americans’ tea drinking habits for the past several decades, is currently the president of the American Tea Association and has served in the world-renowned tea company Lipton.

On June 21, as a representative of the industry, Goji, when the US government plans to impose a tariff on the US$300 million worth of Chinese exports to the United States, publicly opposes the US government’s taxation on tea and hopes to import black tea from China. Products such as green tea are removed from the tax collection list.

Geji told Xinhua News Agency that although Americans still prefer coffee more than tea, after years of cultivation, the size of the US tea market has grown from about $2.5 billion 20 years ago to 12.5 billion today. Dollar.

According to statistics from the American Tea Association, about 80% of Americans drink tea, and in the younger millennials, the proportion of tea is 87%. More than eight of the teas Americans drink become black tea, and green tea accounts for about 15%.

In recent years, Americans’ interest in Chinese tea is gradually rising, especially regional tea products with the unique taste, appearance, and aroma, which are favored by more and more Americans.

West Lake Longjing and Yunnan Black Tea are personal favorites of Goji. “The production process of Longjing Tea is very fine, the leaves are very beautiful, I like the way the tea is sitting in the cup, and the wonderful aroma and taste.”

Geji said that due to the particularity of terrain, climate and local manufacturing processes, Chinese tea-based Longjing, Pu’er, Tieguanyin and other teas could not find alternative suppliers elsewhere. If tariffs are imposed on these products, American consumers, as well as tea importers, will suffer.

Chinese tea has covered all areas of the US tea market. Goji said that whether it is the ordinary tea provided in the restaurant or the relatively high-end famous tea such as Longjing; whether it is sold in the supermarket or ordered online, Chinese tea is ubiquitous in the US tea market.

Goji said that tariffs will bring risk to the US consumers, but at the same time, they will not have much impact on Chinese tea producers, because the tea exported to the United States accounts for less than 1% of China’s total tea production.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *